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“I recently had two teeth that required major repair work. Because of the nature of the work involved, my dentist recommended that I visit Dr. Violich and his team. As a person who has always dreaded the visit to the dentist, my experience was nothing short of amazing. Where was the pain and discomfort? The procedure was lengthy and I was amazed thatI fell asleep at least on a couple of occasions while Darryl was at work! If you need specialised dental treatment, I highly recommend Bay Endodontics.”
Dave Riddleston, Papamoa

FAQ's

In New Zealand, an endodontist is a general dentist who has completed two or more years of post dental study in endodontics and met the rigorous requirements of the Dental Council of New Zealand to be admitted and registered as an Endodontic Specialist. 

Toothache is most commonly caused by inflammation due to the infection of the dental pulp or nerves.  Inflammation may also arise from physical damage caused by an accident, or from biting on something that causes a crack in the tooth.  Inflammation may be present without infection or the two may coexist.

We have millions of bacteria (germs) in our mouths.  Many of them cause no harm, but scientific studies have shown that some species associated with dental decay and others are associated with gum disease and infections of the root canals.  There are over 500 different species of bacteria in the human mouth.  The bacteria in our mouths do not usually infect our jaws because the gums act as an effective barrier to most bacteria.  If teeth become infected, this may allow bacteria to cause an infection in the bone.

Endodontic treatment is more commonly known as root canal therapy.  Endodontics is carried out to relieve dental pain and save teeth by locating the infected or inflamed dental pulp in the root canals.  The canals are thoroughly cleaned and shaped then sealed for healing to take place.

The dental pulp consists of connective tissue with nerves and blood vessels contained in the canal with the root.   The pulp is responsible for most of the early growth and development of the tooth in childhood.  Once mature, the tooth can survive without the pulp because the surrounding tissues continue to support it throughout its life.

Endodontic treatment consists of removing the diseased pulp from the tooth, eliminating infection and completely sealing the canals with a filling material.  This can take anywhere from one to five or more visits depending on the complexity of your treatment.  In some instances, minor surgery may be necessary to treat a tooth and if this is indicated you will be advised.  A tooth can sometimes be tender for a day or two after the treatment and you will be informed what to do it this occurs.

With modern techniques and anaesthetic, most patients report no discomfort during the procedure.   The tooth may feel sensitive after the procedure specially if there was pain or infection before the procedure.  Over-the-counter or prescription pain relief medication can alleviate this discomfort.  However, if you experience severe pain or if the pain persists more than a few days, contact your endodontist.

The aims of endodontic treatment are to relieve pain, by removing infection, to provide an environment for healing to take place.  We cannot make healing take place, but studies show that in the hands of a specialist this occurs in over 90% of cases.  If the outlook for your tooth is considered less favourable, you will be informed.  If necessary, you may be recalled periodically after the completion of the treatment so that we can confirm that healing is progressing.

There is no charge for recall appointments.

An endodontically treated or root filled tooth is not a ‘dead tooth”, but only a pulpless one which can function normally for an indefinite period of time.  However, teeth which have been root filled are at risk of fracture if they are not restored promptly.  There is often only a shell of enamel left in teeth that have been heavily filled, but as long as the new filling or crown covers the tooth completely, this will help protect the remaining tooth structure.  You are advised to make an appointment with your general dentist promptly after the completion of endodontic treatment.

Most teeth can be endodontically treated.  In some cases, a tooth with inaccessible canals, a severely fractured root, or one with no adequate bone cannot be saved. However, advances in endodontics have made it possible to save teeth that would have been lost a few years ago.  Endodontic surgery may be able to save a tooth which conventional endodontic treatment cannot treat effectively.

Cost varies depending on which tooth is to be treated and the complexity of the problem.  Molars or back teeth have more canals and are therefore more difficult to treat so they tend to cost more.  Endodontic treatment and restoration of the natural tooth is generally less expensive than extraction that will either require a bridge or implant to replace the lost tooth.

  1. Root canal treatment fees range between $750.00 and $2,900.00. To give certainty of treatment costs, fees are charged as per quotation and not on an hourly basis.
  2. An initial in-depth consultation and X-rays is $150.00. This appointment takes generally 30 minutes and all aspects of the proposed treatment and costs are discussed
  3. Payment for treatment provided is requested at the end of each appointment unless other prior arrangements have been made

For information about the American Association of Endodontists please visit www.aae.org